Welcome

Welcome to The Lunch Belle, a food website/blog that views the New York City dining scene through the lens - and belly - of a highly opinionated, critical, adorably quirky, and culinary-obsessed thirty-something year old.

For those of you who enjoy highly thorough and traditional restaurant reviews, you may find them located here.  Pressed for time?  Take a peek at The Weekly Eater, where I condense seven days in to one summarized post.

But that's not all!  Additionally, I...

  • ~ For tourists, I can help you create itineraries and answer any questions you may have/offer advice for your upcoming visit to NYC.
  • ~ I can consult and/or advise on all of your small and large events.
  • ~ I will assist you with restaurant recommendations.

 

Just consider me your one-stop NYC-shop!

Search this site
Table of Contents
My delicious calendar
Links of Love
Contributions & affiliations
Login
« Help! Sick and bored... | Main | Advice needed: If you were sick, would you...? »
Friday
Mar302012

Is this why you're fat?

After clicking through this slideshow and happening upon Chef David Burke's answer to his ultimate guilty pleasure, "A Kit Kat bar. I was never allowed to eat sweets as a child, so I find Kit Kats to be the ultimate guilty pleasure," I wondered:  Are parents, who restrict certain foods in their households, unknowingly setting their children up for weight issues/future struggles?

Speaking from personal experience, I'm going to have to say "yes."  I grew up in a household where sugary cereals, soda pop, packaged snacks, chips, etc. were not allowed.  So, whenever I went over to a friend's house whose parents did allow these products in their pantries, I would get so excited and anxious...that I would binge.  As a young child!  Fast forward 10-years:  In going away to college, I was left entirely up to my own devices and demises for, among many other things, my diet.  And just like so many other freshman students, I gained about 15-20 pounds.  But not over the course of one year.  Mine occurred over the course of that first semester.  Why?  Because I could literally eat whatever the hell I wanted.  For the first time in my life!  I didn't have Mommy or Daddy eyeing my every meal like a hawk.  They weren't planning and shopping for my breakfasts, lunches, snacks, and dinners.  I was!  And you can bet your ass that my grocery cart consisted of chips, candy, ice cream, cheese, and Little Debbie cakes.  Man, I thought I was so suave and rebellious...until I went home for that first Thanksgiving and saw the horrified looks on everyone's faces.  I had blown up like a beach ball. 

So now, I turn the question over to you:  Do you think that parents, who restrict certain foods in their households, unknowingly set their children up for weight issues/future struggles?

~~~

Until we eat again,

The Lunch Belle

PrintView Printer Friendly Version

Reader Comments (5)

sigh...unfortunately...unequivocally...yes...yes...yes

March 30, 2012 | Unregistered Commenterchowdom

Addendum:
Regarding" this" slideshow I'll take a # 5 please

March 30, 2012 | Unregistered Commenterchowdom

Ah Linds -we have SO much in common!!

XX
Julie

March 31, 2012 | Unregistered CommenterJulie

Yes! And my Mom did the same thing! My brother and I would eat a whole box of cookies together, if my mom ever bought any, because we knew they were probably the last ones we'd see for a long time!

March 31, 2012 | Unregistered CommenterMom

I have to say I'm so thankful that my parents didn't restrict any food in our house. (Other than cheetos because my mother didn't want our orange fingerprints on the walls. We were only allowed to eat those in the car.) My parents always encouraged us to indulge within reason. I will raise my kids the same way!

March 31, 2012 | Unregistered CommenterJGIWC

PostPost a New Comment

Enter your information below to add a new comment.

My response is on my own website »
Author Email (optional):
Author URL (optional):
Post:
 
Some HTML allowed: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <code> <em> <i> <strike> <strong>